Digital Media

Digging Deeper Into The New York Times’ Fact-Checking Faux Pas

  • By
  • Lucas Graves,
  • New America Foundation
January 19, 2012 |

Once in a while the cultural fault lines in American journalism come into unexpectedly sharp relief. Jon Stewart’s now-legendary star turn on “Crossfire” was one of those moments; the uproar over NPR’s refusal (along with most major news outlets) to call waterboarding torture was another. The New York Times may have added another clash to this canon with public editor Arthur Brisbane’s blog post on fact-checking last week.

Consent of the Networked

January 31, 2012

A global struggle for control of the Internet is now underway.  At stake are no less than civil liberties, privacy and even the character of democracy in the 21st century.

Saving Face

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
December 19, 2011 |

Has Google finally grown up? The care with which it has handled facial-recognition technology seems to support this thesis. Compare it with Facebook. When Zuckerberg's social network unveiled its facial-recognition technology in June, it found itself in the middle of a global privacy backlash.

The Internet’s Intolerable Acts

  • By
  • Sascha Meinrath,
  • James Losey,
  • New America Foundation
December 8, 2011 |

The United States of America was forged in resistance to collective reprisals—the punishment of many for the acts of few. In 1774, following the Boston Tea Party, the British Parliament passed a series of laws—including the mandated closure of the port of Boston—meant to penalize the people of Massachusetts. These abuses of power, labeled the "Intolerable Acts," catalyzed the American Revolution by making plain the oppression of the British crown.

Rebecca MacKinnon to Congress: 'There Is No Silver Bullet for Achieving Internet Freedom'

December 9, 2011

Yesterday, New America Foundation's Rebecca MacKinnon testified before the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs hearing on "Promoting Global Internet Freedom."

Stop the Great Firewall of America

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
November 15, 2011 |

China operates the world’s most elaborate and opaque system of Internet censorship. But Congress, under pressure to take action against the theft of intellectual property, is considering misguided legislation that would strengthen China’s Great Firewall and even bring major features of it to America.

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com and cross posted from the Open Technology Initiative.

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

Hear Us Now?

  • By April Manatt, with Stephen G. Blake, Joe Mathews and Troy K. Schneider
October 20, 2011

Hidden in all the bad news about California’s troubles is this delightful paradox: Californians, while living in a state that experts say is ungovernable, have within their reach new tools that give them greater power to govern themselves than ever before.

Bugger Off

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
October 4, 2011 |

Back in the day, when bad guys used telephones, the FBI and other law enforcement agencies would listen in with wiretaps. As long as phone companies cooperated—and they had to, by law—it was a relatively straightforward process. The Internet, however, separated providers of communications services—Skype, Facebook, Gmail—from those running the underlying infrastructure. Thus, even if the FBI obtains a suspect's traffic data from their Internet service provider (ISP)—Comcast, Verizon, etc.—it may be difficult to make sense of it, especially if the suspect has been using encrypted services.

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